Viewing entries tagged
trees

Shady and healthy

Shady and healthy

Hi everyone,

A clear example that bioretention systems are a harsh environment that a little shade can help!

See this asset on The WSUD Map @ ID B01537.

Cheers

Jack

It's canopy and understorey

It's canopy and understorey

Hi everyone,

On Ideanthro we tend to prattle on about how important it is to include trees in bioretention systems. Here’s the thing thought. Just saying “put trees in bioretention” doesn’t quite cut it because it implies that trees are the whole solution. They aren’t. Trees are a part of the vegetation in a well functioning bioretention system. They need to be used alongside understorey plants. In this episode we demonstrate one reason why.

Cheers

Jack

Ecological niches in bioretention

Ecological niches in bioretention

Hi everyone,

It’s been a little while since we released an Ideanthro episode. We have more than a few interesting things going on and they’ve been consuming our time.

BUT!

Today one of those things provided us with a golden opportunity to film. So film we did.

We have recently been conducting condition inspections on Gold Coast City Council’s stormwater treatment assets. Some 376 of them in fact. In this episode we take a look at a very large bioretention system and discuss the ecological niches developing in it.

Find this asset as B01534 on The WSUD Map.

Cheers

Jack

Why did that grow there?

Why did that grow there?

Hi there,

The way stormwater treatment systems develop as ecosystems over time is a constant fascination to us (and hence a regular topic on Ideanthro!). In today's episode we visit the Wakerley bioretention system (asset ID #B00028 on The WSUD Map). It is large. It has three cells. New species are popping up in all of them; but more so in one of the cells than the others. We wondered why?

Cheers

Jack

Rain

Rain

Hi there,

Destructive though they may be, floods present an opportunity to learn about the function of our urban waterways and stormwater system in detail. In the wake of former tropical cyclone Debbie, we take a look at 6 sites in Brisbane:

Cheers

Jack

Trees in bioretention - giving succession a helping hand

Trees in bioretention - giving succession a helping hand

Trees in bioretention - succession

Trees in bioretention - succession

Welcome back to our "yeah we get it, you're still talking about trees in bioretention - series"

This time, something really interesting. The past episodes were interesting, but this fascinated us when we spotted it. Succession. The Hoyland St bioretention system is old. Some of the plants are dying. But a new wave might just be coming through. This is probably the first time ever that succession has been observed in a bioretention system!

Previous episodes in this series:

Part 1 - Why we're obsessed with trees in bioretention

Part 2 - Trees in bioretention - selecting understorey plants

Part 3 - Trees in bioretention - resetting the system

Part 4 - An idea - fixing clogged bioretention with trees and plants

Part 5 - Trees in bioretention - aesthetics and maintenance

Cheers

Jack

Trees in bioretention - aesthetics and maintenance

Trees in bioretention - aesthetics and maintenance

Welcome back to the "wow you still have more to say about trees in bioretention series!"

In this episode we discuss what the effect of the aesthetics of a bioretention system with trees is on maintenance requirements for that system.

Previous episodes in this series:

Part 1 - Why we're obsessed with trees in bioretention

Part 2 - Trees in bioretention - selecting understorey plants

Part 3 - Trees in bioretention - resetting the system

Part 4 - An idea - fixing clogged bioretention with trees and plants

Cheers

Jack

An idea - fixing clogged bioretention with trees and plants

An idea - fixing clogged bioretention with trees and plants

Time for Part four in our "really Jack, how much can there possibly be to say about trees in bioretention systems? - series."

This time we are looking at whether a well thought out use of trees can help to unclogged a troubled bioretention system. 

If you missed it, here are the episodes so far in this series!

Part 1 - Why we're obsessed with trees in bioretention

Part 2 - Trees in bioretention - selecting understorey plants

Part 3 - Trees in bioretention - resetting the system

Cheers

Jack

Trees in bioretention - selecting understorey plants

Trees in bioretention - selecting understorey plants

Part 2 in our not-so-mini series looking at trees in bioretention. Today, a viewer question.

Peter asks "I like you're approach to trees in bioretention systems. Is there purpose really to shade out weeds though? Wouldn't we need to change the understorey planting once the trees are established and the light regime changes for the smaller plant?"

Very good question. Let's take a look!

In case you missed it, here is Part 1 in the series - Why we're obsessed with trees in bioretention.

Cheers

Jack

Why we're obsessed with trees in bioretention

Why we're obsessed with trees in bioretention

Welcome to our not-so-mini series looking at trees in bioretention, and why we think it's a great idea... Mostly... In the right spots... Everything needs context right?

Cheers

Jack

Our obsession - trees in bioretention

Our obsession - trees in bioretention

Howdy,

Anyone who knows me will know that I’m obsessed by the potential for trees in bioretention. Shade, leaf drop, organic matter, weed suppression. There’s many reasons to be interested in trees.

But how many trees do you need?

Join us while we talk this through.

Cheers

Jac