Viewing entries tagged
that's like wsud

That's like WSUD - Process

That's like WSUD - Process

Hi there!

Time for another 'That's Like WSUD' episode of Ideanthro; where we take a concept that we have come across and relate it back to water sensitive urban design. In this episode, we're inspired by something that we heard from Aunty Ruby Sims at the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects' recent event 'Conversations with Elders'. Aunty Ruby advocated the importance of ‘process’. We're then surprised to realise it sounds very much like something we recently heard from a very different source!

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - Dan Pink and timing

That's like WSUD - Dan Pink and timing

Hi there,

Time for another 'That's like WSUD' episode.

In his book When, author Dan Pink describes work by Lisa Khan that investigates the relationship between when people graduate and how far up the corporate ladder they climb. Long story short, the strength of the market at the time of graduation makes a big difference. Inspired by this we ask, "does the perception of WSUD at the time someone enters the stormwater industry affect how they relate to the concept throughout their career. Spoiler... we don't have an answer.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - Local and global maxima

That's like WSUD - Local and global maxima

Hi there,

In this episode we discuss the concepts of local and global maxima, and relate them back to water sensitive urban design. Sometimes iteration leads to progress, but at other times it does not. 

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - Going slow

That's like WSUD - Going slow

Hi there,

A couple of episodes back, we took inspiration from Ray Dalio's recent interview on the Tim Ferriss Show to discuss the parallels between the factors that contribute to a successful life (as defined by Ray) and those that might contribute to success in implementing WSUD.

Well... I'm now reading Ray's book! That means, we're drawing inspiration from him again. 

In the book, Ray describes how he learnt to deal with dichotomy's in investing. A dichotomy is where two things, objectives, choices etc appear to be completely opposite. In investing, the typical assumed dichotomy is between risk and returns. Typically its is thought that you can't have high returns and low risk. It's thought to be either high risk, high return or low risk, low return. Ray argues that if you take long enough to think about the situation, most dichotomy's don't actually exist. This struck us as useful to consider in the context of WSUD, particularly in light of our last episode about the need to do more with less in WSUD.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - Ray Dalio on the makings of a successful life

That's like WSUD - Ray Dalio on the makings of a successful life

Hi everyone,

Time for another 'That's Like WSUD' episode, where we take an idea or a concept that we have heard about, read about or somehow otherwise come across, and apply it to WSUD. In today's episode we draw inspiration from a recent episode of The Tim Ferriss Show, where Ray Dalio (AKA the Steve Jobs of investing) describes the three factors that contribute to a successful life. It seems to us that these same three factors might contribute to successfully developing and implementing WSUD.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - The first answer is the...

That's like WSUD - The first answer is the...

Inspired by Nudge by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, we consider what happens when groups attempt to answer challenging questions. Do groups always get it right? Do different groups reach the same decision? Most importantly, what does this mean for WSUD?

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - REVOLUTION

That's like WSUD - REVOLUTION

We take a close look at why public policy seems stuck in a cycle of exciting new idea (that fails to deliver), followed by another exciting new idea (that fails to deliver), followed by another... you get the idea.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - The king of scramble

That's like WSUD - The king of scramble

Hi there,

Marcelo Garcia is considered one of the best grapplers (think wrestling and Brazilian jiu-jitsu) in the world. Josh Waitzkin was a child chess prodigy turned martial arts world champion and master learner.

In an interview for the Tim Ferriss show, Josh describes how Marcelo (his friend) is known in the martial arts world as 'the king of scramble'. The nickname came about, because while Marcelo is a very strong martial artist in conventional grappling techniques and positions, his real talent is his ability to transition between from one position to another better than anyone else in the world.

This got us thinking about WSUD. WSUD is on a journey as it evolves. The way WSUD currently looks today will not be the same as the water sensitive city of the future. While it's very tempting to get comfortable with the current WSUD paradigm, maybe there is something to be learnt from Marcelo when it comes to being comfortable in the transition...

Like this episode? You can find more ideas inspired by Josh Waitzkin here.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - Learning to play chess

That's like WSUD - Learning to play chess

Hi,

In his book The Art of Learning, Josh Waitzkin explains that young chess players are normally taught in one of two ways. Complex opening repertoires vs internalising the principles by learning the end game.

It strikes me that our journey to a water sensitive future is like a chess game. It will progress through different phases. We should definitely develop skills in the current phase (or paradigm), but not at the expense of understanding the principles that will ultimately underpin a water sensitive future. 

Like this episode? You can find more ideas inspired by Josh Waitzkin here.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - The art of learning

That's like WSUD - The art of learning

Hi everyone,

Josh Waitzkin is a former child chess prodigy turned martial arts world champion and author, but his real skill is learning and performance. In his book, the Art of Learning (which, by the way, is a great book) Josh describes the challenges he faced while writing his first book about chess. As an accomplished chess player, Josh found it challenging to take the many concepts that he had internalised, and unearth them in order to teach them in the book.

Josh's challenges reminded me a little bit of WSUD. Particularly the challenge that I currently see us having developing scoring systems to rate the condition of vegetated stormwater treatment assets. I know many people who can very accurately assess a system and talk about its condition, but when it comes to codifying this in a teachable and repeatable framework... well I've never seen it work...

Perhaps we can learn something from Josh's experience.

Cheers

Jack

 

 

That's like WSUD - Simon Sinek's golden circle

That's like WSUD - Simon Sinek's golden circle

I can still remember when I was introduced to Simon Sinek's concept of a 'golden circle' to explain how great leaders inspire action. It was one of those moments where you're left think 'wow, that makes a lot of sense.' For me, it provided a framework through which to understand some recent successes I had seen in WSUD.

Cheers

Jack