Viewing entries tagged
ecology

Lomandra island

Lomandra island

Hi everyone,

Does removing a (literal and physical) truckload of sediment from a bioretention system mean that ALL the plants need to go too?

Cheers

Jack

It's canopy and understorey

It's canopy and understorey

Hi everyone,

On Ideanthro we tend to prattle on about how important it is to include trees in bioretention systems. Here’s the thing thought. Just saying “put trees in bioretention” doesn’t quite cut it because it implies that trees are the whole solution. They aren’t. Trees are a part of the vegetation in a well functioning bioretention system. They need to be used alongside understorey plants. In this episode we demonstrate one reason why.

Cheers

Jack

Ecological niches in bioretention

Ecological niches in bioretention

Hi everyone,

It’s been a little while since we released an Ideanthro episode. We have more than a few interesting things going on and they’ve been consuming our time.

BUT!

Today one of those things provided us with a golden opportunity to film. So film we did.

We have recently been conducting condition inspections on Gold Coast City Council’s stormwater treatment assets. Some 376 of them in fact. In this episode we take a look at a very large bioretention system and discuss the ecological niches developing in it.

Find this asset as B01534 on The WSUD Map.

Cheers

Jack

Why did that grow there?

Why did that grow there?

Hi there,

The way stormwater treatment systems develop as ecosystems over time is a constant fascination to us (and hence a regular topic on Ideanthro!). In today's episode we visit the Wakerley bioretention system (asset ID #B00028 on The WSUD Map). It is large. It has three cells. New species are popping up in all of them; but more so in one of the cells than the others. We wondered why?

Cheers

Jack

Where there's smoke there's... bioretention

Where there's smoke there's... bioretention

Hello hello!

Today's episode is inspired by the ABC's Gardening Australia program.

In a recent episode, Josh Byrne interviewed Professor Kingsley Dixon about his work into what causes Australian native plants to germinate. Long story short, smoke is important!

This got us thinking. If smoke is important for Australian native plants to germinate, what does that mean for us trying to establish self sustaining bioretention systems?

Cheers

Jack