Viewing entries tagged
bioretention

When it looks like bioretention but isn't

When it looks like bioretention but isn't

Hi everyone,

Way back in episode 16 we discussed how to tell if the bioretention system that you are looking at is indeed a bioretention system.

In today’s episode, the opposite.

How to tell that they thing you’re looking at which looks like bioretention according to what we said in episode 16 actually isn’t.

Cheers

Jack

Shady and healthy

Shady and healthy

Hi everyone,

A clear example that bioretention systems are a harsh environment that a little shade can help!

See this asset on The WSUD Map @ ID B01537.

Cheers

Jack

Too much sediment to work right

Too much sediment to work right

Hi everyone,

In today’s episode. A bioretention system with a heap of fine sediment on the surface and yet it still drains quicker than the nearby sediment basins.

See this asset on The WSUD Map @ ID B01536.

Cheers

Jack

Lomandra island

Lomandra island

Hi everyone,

Does removing a (literal and physical) truckload of sediment from a bioretention system mean that ALL the plants need to go too?

Cheers

Jack

It's canopy and understorey

It's canopy and understorey

Hi everyone,

On Ideanthro we tend to prattle on about how important it is to include trees in bioretention systems. Here’s the thing thought. Just saying “put trees in bioretention” doesn’t quite cut it because it implies that trees are the whole solution. They aren’t. Trees are a part of the vegetation in a well functioning bioretention system. They need to be used alongside understorey plants. In this episode we demonstrate one reason why.

Cheers

Jack

Ecological niches in bioretention

Ecological niches in bioretention

Hi everyone,

It’s been a little while since we released an Ideanthro episode. We have more than a few interesting things going on and they’ve been consuming our time.

BUT!

Today one of those things provided us with a golden opportunity to film. So film we did.

We have recently been conducting condition inspections on Gold Coast City Council’s stormwater treatment assets. Some 376 of them in fact. In this episode we take a look at a very large bioretention system and discuss the ecological niches developing in it.

Find this asset as B01534 on The WSUD Map.

Cheers

Jack

Low cost bioretention 12 months on

Low cost bioretention 12 months on

Hi there,

In this episode we revisit the low-cost bioretention systems constructed by Blue Mountains City Council to see how much they have changed in the year since we last saw them.

Cheers

Jack

Stormwater 2018 - Our seven favourite things

Stormwater 2018 - Our seven favourite things

Hi there,

We recently returned from the Stormwater 2018 conference. This might sound funny, but we didn’t really have many expectations going in. Not low expectations, we just didn’t think much about it in the lead up. However it turned out to be a great conference. In this episode we discuss our 7 favourite things from Stormwater 2018.

The follow is a list of links relevant to the episode:

Regarding Brad Dalrymple’s presentation about stormwater offsets:

  • Keep an eye out of episode 259, where Brad and I will sit down for a chat about offsets and much, much more.

Regarding Alan Hoban’s presentation:

  • Refer to episode 213 for a discussion of water losses in bioretention.

  • Refer to episode 230 for a discussion of recent research which questions the conventional wisdom about how much pollution is generated by urban stormwater.

  • Refer to episode 231 for a discussion with Alan Hoban about how to deal with these challenging topics.

Keep an eye out for episode 260 where Jonas Larson and I will be chatting about his research.

Episode 253 is where you will find an example of a bioretention system being modified by the community for bike riding (relevant to the presentation by Sophia Findlay and Anna Milner).

Regarding Blue Mountains Council’s low cost bioretention systems and everything I love about them:

  • Episode 208 is where I wax lyrical.

  • Upcoming episode 261 is where I will soon be giving an update, 12 months on.

For a conversation with Mark Liebman about treating stormwater as a resource, refer to episode 211.

For footage of my introduction to the debate, scroll to the bottom of this page and sign up for the Ideanthro eNews… we’ll send it to you once we have a copy!

Cheers

Jack

Fascinating bioretention and a friend

Fascinating bioretention and a friend

Hi there,

So… it turns out that these bioretention systems have grown themselves a mini-series here on Ideanthro. We’re talking about it again.

Today we’re joined by Hermann Paulenz. Hermann watched the first two episodes about this bioretention system and he and I got into an interesting conversation in the comments on YouTube and LinkedIn. So interesting in fact that we figured that we should make a time to chat in person. That chat is what you see here.

In this episode, we discuss recent things that I have learnt about the site, and Hermann proposes some ideas for how to investigate the source of the sediment entering the bioretention systems.

Cheers

Jack

BTW - Want to learn more about bioretention? Check out our Bioretention in the Real World course.

BTW BTW - What to see this site in person? Find it on The WSUD Map. It’s item number B00654.

The bioretention that continues to fascinate

The bioretention that continues to fascinate

Hi there,

Today we have a viewer question. Our question comes from Dan Robson. You might remember Dan from episode 160 when he applied his horticultural knowledge to bioretention systems.

Dan’s question pertains to the last episode of Ideanthro (where we investigated a fascinating site with fix bioretention systems in series on a pseudo-natural channel). Dan asks whether sediment forebays or lower overflow weirs would have help prevent the sediment issues at this site.

Cheers

Jack

BTW - Want to learn more about bioretention? Check out our Bioretention in the Real World course.

Sunlight plus water equals moss

Sunlight plus water equals moss

Hi there,

Moss in bioretention. It's a topic we have explored a few times recently (Episodes 171, 172 and 243) Over that time we have pieced together a detailed understanding of how and when it grows in bioretention. It today's episode we find the perfect demonstration of this at play.

Want to learn more about bioretention? Check out our Bioretention in the Real World course.

Cheers

Jack

That's not a bioretention plant and that's ok

That's not a bioretention plant and that's ok

Hi there,

On today's episode Steph Brown shows us a bioretention system where the plants don't fit the typical mould. We're talking about a well integrated system in a mixed use development with ornamental species.

Cheers

Jack

How to monitor stormwater treatment devices

How to monitor stormwater treatment devices

Hi there,

Monitoring the performance of stormwater treatment devices. It's about time we got to this topic in detail (we did touch on it briefly in Episode 185 - An Old Test). On the surface, monitoring the performance of stormwater treatment devices seems simply. Unfortunately it isn't. That's a pit, because it's an important topic. However a little knowledge about monitoring can guide us a long way. In this episode, Darren Drapper joins us to discuss the ins and outs of how to monitor stormwater treatment devices, as well as common pitfalls and challenges.

Cheers

Jack

Zero additional maintenance WSUD 4

Zero additional maintenance WSUD 4

Hi there,

Making WSUD affordable. In our opinion it has to be one of the highest priorities for water sensitive urban design at present. To date, one of the best attempts at this has been Manningham City Council's Zero Additional Maintenance (ZAM) WSUD bioretention systems. We have spoken about these previously here and here. In this episode we catch up with Simon Brink from Manningham City Council and Harsha Fowdar from Monash University to discuss the latest ZAM WSUD news; specifically, recent research showing that multiple turf species deliver effective performance in bioretention systems. That is a big piece in delivering affordable bioretention!

In the episode Simon and Harsha refer to various ZAM WSUD documents available on the Clearwater website. Follow the link in the last sentence to take a look. 

Cheers

Jack

No longer so bad bioretention

No longer so bad bioretention

Hi there,

Today we jam a concept down your throat for the millionth time. The power of creating bush land style ecosystems in stormwater infrastructure. In this episode we show you a site you've probably never heard of before and argue that it provides a template to rehabilitate the worst cases of unattractive bioretention and detention basins in Australia. 

Cheers

Jack

Shedding light on algae in bioretention

Shedding light on algae in bioretention

Hi there,

Back in episode 172 we identified shade and leaf drop as ways to stop algae and moss from growing in bioretention systems. Today, we show this at work in a slightly different environment.

Cheers

Jack

One way crossfall bioretention

One way crossfall bioretention

Hi there,

Today we visit a streetscape bioretention system with a difference. The road it drains has one way crossfall. We take a look at why this can be a good solution.

Cheers

Jack