Front of Mind - Overcoming the challenge of urban hydrology

Front of Mind - Overcoming the challenge of urban hydrology

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

Today we're joined by Emma James. Urban hydrology is front of mind for Emma. We discuss the importance of managing urban hydrology if we want healthy urban waterways. This isn't easy though. On lot practices might be a part of the mix. How do we implement hydrologic management at scale and in a cost effective manner. Join us for this wide ranging conversation.

Cheers

Jack

Front of Mind - Food and excess urban water

Front of Mind - Food and excess urban water

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi everyone,

I feel like I've waited a long time to have this chat. Our guest today is Kim Markwell from E2DesignLab. Food and excess urban water is front of mind for Kim. When I first began filming for Ideanthro in early 2016 Kim and I spoke about this idea. Fast forward to 2018 and we finally sat down to chat on camera. We discuss the different scales at which urban food production and beneficial use of excess urban water can occur, as well as the need to embed this thinking and practice within land use planning.

In this episode Kim mentions the following projects. You might want to take a look.

Cheers

Jack

Front of Mind - Engagement

Front of Mind - Engagement

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

Today we're joined by Piet Filet. Engagement and community for professionals is front of mind for Piet. In this conversation Piet draws on his experience running the Flood Community of Practice to discuss how these sorts of communities help to drive better water management practices.

Cheers

Jack

Front of Mind - Swimming in the Brisbane River

Front of Mind - Swimming in the Brisbane River

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

You might have heard about the push to make the Parramatta River swimmable again, but did you know that people once used to swim in the Brisbane River. In fact, a lot of people used to swim in the Brisbane River. Inspired by a picture from the 1930's of people swimming in the river near the Indooroopilly bridge, Amalie Wright of Landscapology joins us to talk and stories and community use of waterways.

Cheers

Jack

Codesign and creek restoration

Codesign and creek restoration

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hello hello!

Recently we have had the pleasure to watch (and film) as a codesign process is applied to a waterway restoration project. What is codesign? Its probably easier to explain what codesign isn't. In standard landscape projects, you typically assemble a design team, develop a concept and then take it to the public for consultation. Codesign flips this around and consults the public early, thoroughly and honestly before any design is produced. 

Healthy Land and Water is currently using codesign in their Davidson St Creek Restoration project. They invited us along to film the process. 

In this episode, I share my thoughts on the process so far. If you want to see more, check out the video below that we made for Healthy Land and Water. Keep you eyes pealed, we'll be following the project right through to construction.

BTW - our regular Front of Mind series will be back next week. We just couldn't resist interrupting it to talk codesign while it's fresh.

Cheers

Jack

Front of Mind - Swales, infiltration, high groundwater

Front of Mind - Swales, infiltration, high groundwater

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

Today we're joined by Floris Boogaard. You might remember Floris from that time in The Netherlands when we narrowly avoided being soaked in a storm.

Floris joins us to tell us about research that he has completed recently looking at how quickly the stormwater in wadis (AKA swales) takes to disappear after a storm event. Floris has dosed numerous swales in The Netherlands and even completed repeat dosings to investigate the effects of concurrent storm events. You can see footage of Floris's swale research in the episode or directly in the videos below. For a country that is largely below sea level and facing increased rainfall intensity due to climate change, this is an interesting application of water sensitive urban design to manage flooding.

Cheers

Jack

Front of mind - When new information changes the landscape

Front of mind - When new information changes the landscape

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

The concept of water sensitive urban design might be more than 20 years old, but we have so much still to learn. Today we're joined by Alan Hoban to talk about how we as an industry deal with new information. This is definitely front of his mind. Should we embrace it and change? Approach it with caution? Howl heresy into the wind?

For our discussion, Alan and I draw upon recent research that shows that residential and commercial areas in South East Queensland generate less sediment, nitrogen and phosphorous that previously thought, as well as research showing bioretention systems 'disappearing' large amounts of water.

Cheers

Jack

Front of mind - Less pollution than expected

Front of mind - Less pollution than expected

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

Welcome to the very first episode of Front of Mind, the series where we grab a guest (or two!) from our broader stormwater and water sensitive urban design industry to discuss the topics that are interestering, puzzling or fascinating them at the moment.

Today we're joined by Darren Drapper and Andy Hornbuckle to discuss their recently released journal article that shows residential and industrial areas in South East Queensland generating less stormwater pollution than previously thought. This paper has the potential to be a game changer for stormwater management. At the very least it highlights how much we still don't know about stormwater pollution.

Cheers

Jack

To outlet pit or not to outlet pit

To outlet pit or not to outlet pit

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

In some situations bioretention system might not need an outlet pit. This is great. It saves money and resources. However is there a catch?

Cheers

Jack

Our new favourite bioretention system

Our new favourite bioretention system

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

We prattle on about turning bioretention systems into self-sustaining ecosystems. Recently we stumbled across a system as close to what we have in mind as we have ever seen. Unsurprisingly its our new favourite bioretention system.

The funny thing about this system as this we've been to it before.  A little over 3 years ago. At that point it was nice... but only nice. It sure has grown over time.

Check it out on The WSUD Map. It's asset number B00081. 

Cheers

Jack

Memories of an open drain

Memories of an open drain

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

In this episode we consider this picture on an open drain from 1960's Mackay. It was posted to Facebook by the page "Have You Seen the Old Mackay?" The picture is interesting, but the comments were fascinating and inspired this episode.

A quick thanks - we came across this post thanks to a share form Amalie Wright of Landscapology fame!

For those of you listening in audio only, here are the comments from Facebook (suitably redacted to make names and places anonymous):

  • *NAME REMOVED* the drain went way down to the salt flats behind Ray St. We lived in *STREET NAME REMOVED*. Always had a good swim when the tides were high. They came right up in our gutters. Wow, that’s along time ago.
  • That is just one of those things you don't really notice going, until someone mentions it and suddenly "oh...when did that go? I remember that.
  • My grandmother was the first house in *STREET NAME REMOVED* which is about where this photo was taken from. I used to be in those drains a lot in rainy season
  • *NAME REMOVED* your Nans little house is in this. I remember the drain well. Loved it in high tides... and Floods.
  • Many hours of fun had in those drains and I feel sure our parents would have worried if they knew what we got up to.
  • Caught lobbies in those drains on the corner of Bridge and Nebo Road in the late 50s and early 60s.
  • Probably worked better than today’s drainage.
  • Circa 1960 is where Sarina township is still at!
  • *STREET NAME REMOVED*. The 2nd street I lived in mackay
  • I remember going down that on a surfboard one day. Whoop Whoop!!
  • I remember. Loved those days life was so simple
  • Open drains were the best in wet season. Got old dinghies out and paddle around streets
  • The shops were a newsagents and the post office which only moved premises in recent years.
  • Wow, I played in those drains.
  • I am sure the grocer shop was Worthington’s when I was a kid.
  • The shops on the left are still there too.
  • They should of kept the drain.
  •  I walked past that drain every day going to and from school. THREE *NAMES REMOVED 
  • *NAME REMOVED* bottlo on the left up there.
  • Lived in *STREET NAME REMOVED*.around that time..
  • Right beside our house in *STREET NAME REMOVED*
  • Remember it very well wow.
  • *NAME REMOVED* do u remember this?
     

Cheers

Jack

30 more bags of filter media

30 more bags of filter media

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

In episode 216 we presented the results of research into bioretention filter media. In this episode we continue that investigation with fresh data looking into the relationship between filter media properties and the amount of water available to plants. The results weren't what we expected. 

The see the full data, visit our bioretention filter media research page.

Cheers

Jack

Learning from water in Copenhagen

Learning from water in Copenhagen

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

In this episode we are joined by Simon Roberts from E2 Design Lab. Simon recently travelled to Copenhagen to participate in the Copenhagen Urban Lab. The event brought together six professionals of different disciplines for a week long intensive looking into a water challenge in Copenhagen. We talk with Simon about his experience during the week.   

Cheers

Jack

Smooth or rough

Smooth or rough

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

We continue or discussion of global and local maxima (see episode 221), using the concept of a smooth or rough landscape to guide how we react.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - Local and global maxima

That's like WSUD - Local and global maxima

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

In this episode we discuss the concepts of local and global maxima, and relate them back to water sensitive urban design. Sometimes iteration leads to progress, but at other times it does not. 

Cheers

Jack

Why did that grow there?

Why did that grow there?

Download as an MP3 by right-clicking here and choosing “save as.”


Hi there,

The way stormwater treatment systems develop as ecosystems over time is a constant fascination to us (and hence a regular topic on Ideanthro!). In today's episode we visit the Wakerley bioretention system (asset ID #B00028 on The WSUD Map). It is large. It has three cells. New species are popping up in all of them; but more so in one of the cells than the others. We wondered why?

Cheers

Jack