That's like WSUD - The art of learning

That's like WSUD - The art of learning

Hi everyone,

Josh Waitzkin is a former child chess prodigy turned martial arts world champion and author, but his real skill is learning and performance. In his book, the Art of Learning (which, by the way, is a great book) Josh describes the challenges he faced while writing his first book about chess. As an accomplished chess player, Josh found it challenging to take the many concepts that he had internalised, and unearth them in order to teach them in the book.

Josh's challenges reminded me a little bit of WSUD. Particularly the challenge that I currently see us having developing scoring systems to rate the condition of vegetated stormwater treatment assets. I know many people who can very accurately assess a system and talk about its condition, but when it comes to codifying this in a teachable and repeatable framework... well I've never seen it work...

Perhaps we can learn something from Josh's experience.

Cheers

Jack

 

 

Finding inspiration - Auburn River

Finding inspiration - Auburn River

Hi there!

In today's episode a trip to Auburn River National Park inspires a discussion of equity in urban waterway management and water sensitive urban design.

Cheers

Jack

Taking every opportunity - with Bhakti Devi

Taking every opportunity - with Bhakti Devi

One of the things that I love about makings these Ideanthro videos is the opportunity to find out how and why people approach their work the way they do. Recently Bhakti Devi was kind enough to share a lot of her time with me to discuss how she approached sustainable urban water management while in working in local government.

Cheers

Jack

A horticulture perspective on bioretention

A horticulture perspective on bioretention

Hi there!

In today's episode I sit down to chat with Dan Robson, to bring a horticulturalists perspective to bioretention.

What could we plant and what it would need to grow? 

Dan brings a really unique perspective to this. I first met him when he was studying Environmental Management at Griffith University. On top of that he has bucket loads of horticultural experience from working in the nursery industry. And if that isn't enough, he is one of the few people to have actually done on ground, real world testing of bioretention performance.

You can see how this chat might get interesting.

I hope you enjoy my chat with Dan Robson.

Cheers

Jack

Zero additional maintenance WSUD 3

Zero additional maintenance WSUD 3

Hi there,

You know when you've had some really great discussions with people. Through these discussions you are collectively but almost accidentally developing an idea that you with will be great.

Yep?

What about the feeling of excitement you get when you realise that someone already did it!

And they did it five whole years ago!

That's what this episode is about. A cool low maintenance bioretention approach that I was shown in New Zealand by Robyn Simcock.

If you're interested in more low maintenance bioretention, check out:

Cheers

Jack

Planning for failure

Planning for failure

Hi everyone,

In this episode we are joined by Frances Charters from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand to discuss the concept of building known failure points into infrastructure to make rebuilding it easier after natural disasters. Frances explains to us how this thinking has been applied in Christchurch since the earthquakes, and we discuss how it might apply more generally to stormwater infrastructure.

Cheers

Jack

Fine balance part 2

Fine balance part 2

Hi everyone,

Today we are joined by Robyn Simcock and continue our look at how to create a bioretention filter media mix that balances pollutant removal, hydraulic conductivity, plant health and all the many things that filter media needs to do. Robyn shares her vast experience as filter media in New Zealand has evolved over the past decade. In many respect this episode carries on from episode 143.

Cheers

Jack

Two important WSUD lessons from New Zealand

Two important WSUD lessons from New Zealand

Hello there!

Today, more from WSUD in New Zealand. Specifically, two important observations. The first has to do with how vertical drops in public spaces are treated in New Zealand. The second relates to how and why their stormwater policy's appear to be incentivising a far wider array of WSUD approaches than Australia's policy is.

Cheers

Jack

Trusting the process and finding funding

Trusting the process and finding funding

You may remember back in episode 102 we heard from Andy Reese about American stormwater utilities, and the potential benefits of this stormwater governance model. In this episode we continue the discussion with Hector Cyre. I met Hector at the New Zealand Stormwater Conference, where we both presented keynotes. We spoke about the potential of stormwater utilities to provide a stable funding source for stormwater management.

Cheers

Jack

Two reasons for subsidence around bioretention system outlets

Two reasons for subsidence around bioretention system outlets

Today we take a look at a relatively rare (but troublesome when it occurs) problem in bioretention systems. Subsidence around the outlet pit. We look at the two most common reasons that it happens. They're both design/ construction errors. Fix them up and you should be just fine.

Cheers

Jack

Weeds vs desirable plants

Weeds vs desirable plants

Today, a great opportunity to see why it's so important to keep on top of weeds in bioretention systems; and more importantly, why it's so hard to fix things up if you don't.

Cheers

Jack

Tony Weber's passion for water

Tony Weber's passion for water

Hello!

Tony Weber is well known in our industry for his passion and knowledge for water. Several weeks ago Tony made a post on Facebook that caught our attention...

"Around 25 years ago I first started understanding stormwater and hydrology thanks to this place, The Crump weir at Sandy Creek, Indooroopilly. Who would've thought a bit of concrete and some water would allow me to travel the world, helping to save rivers in some amazing places in Australia and overseas. I consider myself very fortunate to love what I do and do what I love, and a lot of that is due to what I learned from this place." - Tony Weber

The more that we speak to people in this industry, the more that we realise that everyone has a story of how they found and well in love with water, WSUD or waterways. How could we resist the opportunity to sit down with Tony, hear his story and pick his brains.

Cheers

Jack

Finding passion and work

Finding passion and work

Today we're joined by Steph Brown from Bligh Tanner

Students regularly ask me for advice on how to find a work experience placement or a first job after uni. Steph and I discuss this topic in detail, including Steph's awesome approach that she used to get first a student placement and then a job at Bligh Tanner.

Enjoy, and thank you Steph for the chat!

Cheers

Jack