Fixing algal clogging in bioretention

Fixing algal clogging in bioretention

Hi there,

In the last episode we identified an uncommon reason for algae to grow on the surface of a bioretention system. As soon as we finished filming it, we discovered something more profound... a potential way to stop the algae growing...

Cheers

Jack

Algae and interflow

Algae and interflow

Howdy,

When bioretention systems receive a constant baseflow, they often grow algae around the inlet. This is well understood. It's a problem because the algae can block the filter media (at least the part that its growing on) and cause water to pond on the surface. Today however, we have a site growing algae for a different reason... I think. It's the first time I have seen it happen for this reason.

Cheers

Jack

Looking good

Looking good

Hello,

Today we have a cracking example of a bioretention system that could have fitted into its surrounding landscape so very nicely...

Cheers

Jack

The problem with geofabric in bioretention

The problem with geofabric in bioretention

Hi everyone,

One of the things that I want to use Ideanthro for is to document why WSUD design guidance says what it does. Today is a prime example. The Water by Design guidelines make it pretty clear that using geofabric on the surface of bioretention systems to suppress weeds isn't a great idea. Today we show you why.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - The king of scramble

That's like WSUD - The king of scramble

Hi there,

Marcelo Garcia is considered one of the best grapplers (think wrestling and Brazilian jiu-jitsu) in the world. Josh Waitzkin was a child chess prodigy turned martial arts world champion and master learner.

In an interview for the Tim Ferriss show, Josh describes how Marcelo (his friend) is known in the martial arts world as 'the king of scramble'. The nickname came about, because while Marcelo is a very strong martial artist in conventional grappling techniques and positions, his real talent is his ability to transition between from one position to another better than anyone else in the world.

This got us thinking about WSUD. WSUD is on a journey as it evolves. The way WSUD currently looks today will not be the same as the water sensitive city of the future. While it's very tempting to get comfortable with the current WSUD paradigm, maybe there is something to be learnt from Marcelo when it comes to being comfortable in the transition...

Like this episode? You can find more ideas inspired by Josh Waitzkin here.

Cheers

Jack

It's virtually water

It's virtually water

Hi there,

Virtual reality and the water sensitive city. Yep... the future is here.

On today's episode we are joined by Peter Bach from Monash University. Peter is currently working on a project to gamify the water sensitive city.

What does that mean?

Take a look and Peter will tell you.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - Learning to play chess

That's like WSUD - Learning to play chess

Hi,

In his book The Art of Learning, Josh Waitzkin explains that young chess players are normally taught in one of two ways. Complex opening repertoires vs internalising the principles by learning the end game.

It strikes me that our journey to a water sensitive future is like a chess game. It will progress through different phases. We should definitely develop skills in the current phase (or paradigm), but not at the expense of understanding the principles that will ultimately underpin a water sensitive future. 

Like this episode? You can find more ideas inspired by Josh Waitzkin here.

Cheers

Jack

That's like WSUD - The art of learning

That's like WSUD - The art of learning

Hi everyone,

Josh Waitzkin is a former child chess prodigy turned martial arts world champion and author, but his real skill is learning and performance. In his book, the Art of Learning (which, by the way, is a great book) Josh describes the challenges he faced while writing his first book about chess. As an accomplished chess player, Josh found it challenging to take the many concepts that he had internalised, and unearth them in order to teach them in the book.

Josh's challenges reminded me a little bit of WSUD. Particularly the challenge that I currently see us having developing scoring systems to rate the condition of vegetated stormwater treatment assets. I know many people who can very accurately assess a system and talk about its condition, but when it comes to codifying this in a teachable and repeatable framework... well I've never seen it work...

Perhaps we can learn something from Josh's experience.

Cheers

Jack

 

 

Finding inspiration - Auburn River

Finding inspiration - Auburn River

Hi there!

In today's episode a trip to Auburn River National Park inspires a discussion of equity in urban waterway management and water sensitive urban design.

Cheers

Jack

Taking every opportunity - with Bhakti Devi

Taking every opportunity - with Bhakti Devi

One of the things that I love about makings these Ideanthro videos is the opportunity to find out how and why people approach their work the way they do. Recently Bhakti Devi was kind enough to share a lot of her time with me to discuss how she approached sustainable urban water management while in working in local government.

Cheers

Jack

A horticulture perspective on bioretention

A horticulture perspective on bioretention

Hi there!

In today's episode I sit down to chat with Dan Robson, to bring a horticulturalists perspective to bioretention.

What could we plant and what it would need to grow? 

Dan brings a really unique perspective to this. I first met him when he was studying Environmental Management at Griffith University. On top of that he has bucket loads of horticultural experience from working in the nursery industry. And if that isn't enough, he is one of the few people to have actually done on ground, real world testing of bioretention performance.

You can see how this chat might get interesting.

I hope you enjoy my chat with Dan Robson.

Cheers

Jack

Zero additional maintenance WSUD 3

Zero additional maintenance WSUD 3

Hi there,

You know when you've had some really great discussions with people. Through these discussions you are collectively but almost accidentally developing an idea that you with will be great.

Yep?

What about the feeling of excitement you get when you realise that someone already did it!

And they did it five whole years ago!

That's what this episode is about. A cool low maintenance bioretention approach that I was shown in New Zealand by Robyn Simcock.

If you're interested in more low maintenance bioretention, check out:

Cheers

Jack

Planning for failure

Planning for failure

Hi everyone,

In this episode we are joined by Frances Charters from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand to discuss the concept of building known failure points into infrastructure to make rebuilding it easier after natural disasters. Frances explains to us how this thinking has been applied in Christchurch since the earthquakes, and we discuss how it might apply more generally to stormwater infrastructure.

Cheers

Jack

Fine balance part 2

Fine balance part 2

Hi everyone,

Today we are joined by Robyn Simcock and continue our look at how to create a bioretention filter media mix that balances pollutant removal, hydraulic conductivity, plant health and all the many things that filter media needs to do. Robyn shares her vast experience as filter media in New Zealand has evolved over the past decade. In many respect this episode carries on from episode 143.

Cheers

Jack

Two important WSUD lessons from New Zealand

Two important WSUD lessons from New Zealand

Hello there!

Today, more from WSUD in New Zealand. Specifically, two important observations. The first has to do with how vertical drops in public spaces are treated in New Zealand. The second relates to how and why their stormwater policy's appear to be incentivising a far wider array of WSUD approaches than Australia's policy is.

Cheers

Jack

Trusting the process and finding funding

Trusting the process and finding funding

You may remember back in episode 102 we heard from Andy Reese about American stormwater utilities, and the potential benefits of this stormwater governance model. In this episode we continue the discussion with Hector Cyre. I met Hector at the New Zealand Stormwater Conference, where we both presented keynotes. We spoke about the potential of stormwater utilities to provide a stable funding source for stormwater management.

Cheers

Jack